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Logan (Movie Review)

Vicente Vera, Opinions Editor

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Superhero movies have been the staple of blockbuster cinema the past decade. Therefore, the oversaturation of this genre was inevitable. With new superhero movies coming out as often as the sun sets, originality is compromised. But every now and then, our patience is rewarded with gems like the movie Logan.

Logan is the latest installment of the X-Men franchise, starring Hugh Jackman as Wolverine aka Logan, and Patrick Stewart as Professor X. According to IMDB, “In the near future, a weary Logan (Wolverine) cares for an ailing Professor X in a hide out on the Mexican border. But Logan's attempts to hide from the world and secure his legacy are threatened when a young mutant arrives, pursued by dark forces.”

The movie is made imaginatively. One does not have to be a comic book geek or follow the original story to appreciate the creative and bold narrative. The film did well, not because it was following the pattern of successful anti superhero movies, but because it was a boundary pusher. The themes are those not usually associated with comic book movies. For instance, the title character Logan, formally know as Wolverine, is a depressed alcoholic and drug addict who works as a chauffeur. His claws are slowly poisoning him as he takes care of the stroke prone Professor X. According to Entertainment Weekly, director James Mangold said he was influenced by Little Miss SunshineThe Wrestler, and the 1977 Clint Eastwood movie The Gauntlet.

Hugh Jackman’s gritty and unsympathetic performance of Logan is beyond comparison. Even though the character and motives of Logan are wholly transformed from his previous performances, Jackman manages to keep the personality and attitude of Wolverine consistent. 

The dark themes of drug abuse and mental illness crippling our favorite super heroes is not easy to push on screen particularly in the initial phase of comic book adaptations. The graphic violence is probably the most I’ve seen in this genre. These attributes make the film unpredictable, leaving you hanging on the edge of your seat at the end of every scene.

I recommend this movie to fans of tragic films. It is particularly difficult to come by such creative films when the genre has been so exhausted by over exposure to similar themes. Trail blazer films of Logan's caliber are a must see. 

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Logan (Movie Review)